Alpine skiing: "Professor Feuz" will be missed by his students

Alpine skiing: “Professor Feuz” will be missed by his students

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Alpine skiing“Professor Feuz” will be missed by his students

The Bernese, who will start for the last time on the Lauberhorn this weekend, was a mentor for his younger teammates in speed. Odermatt, Murisier and Monney pay homage to him at Wengen.

Beat Feuz (left) mentored young teammate Marco Odermatt in speed.

IMAGO/Eibner Europe

By dint of turning around (six second places), Marco Odermatt is predicted a first downhill victory. At the Lauberhorn this Saturday or elsewhere, it will eventually fall. At 25, is the Nidwalden ready to become the leader of the downhill team when Beat Feuz retires on January 21 in Kitzbühel? “No, the retirement of Feuz does not put more pressure on me, there is Niels (Hinterman) or Stefan (Rogentin) who ski fast and who belong to the group of pure descenders, cuts the Swiss. But it’s true that the atmosphere in the team is special these days, with the latest from Beat and the recent announcement of Mauro’s retirement (Caviezel).”

“Beat was a great friend, helping me in every situation, on and off the track. I learned so much with him.”

Marco Odermatt

In recent seasons, “Odi” had become accustomed to sharing recognition, so crucial in speed, with the experienced Beat Feuz who guided him. “No, I won’t be alone,” he smiles. I hope that Justin will take an extra step downhill and be aligned more regularly, because we are used to doing the “recos” of the giant together.

The retirement of his mentor, a four-time Descent Crystal Globe winner, will still leave a void. “Beat taught me a lot of things, it’s hard to mention a single lesson, says the Nidwalden. He was a great friend, who helped me in every situation, on the track but also off it. I learned so much with him.”

Years saved thanks to Feuz

The expertise of “Kugelblitz” during the discovery of the routes allowed the giantist Justin Murisier to progress at high speed, achieving his first top 10 in the queen discipline (7th) at the end of last year in Bormio. “His help with recognition and on key passages was immense, confirms the Bagnard. It saved us time since he informed us of these passes and how to ski. Without that, five years would have been necessary for the good understanding of a descent.

“We will have to do without him, without his advice. Beat is irreplaceable!”

Justin Murisier

The Valaisan was also able to draw inspiration from the zenitude of Professor Feuz. “While I tend to do all workouts flat out from top to bottom, he advised me to take it easy, focus on certain sections and that was going to help me gain energy on the whole season, underlines the apprentice in speed. We ski on the same brand of skis, there too he brought me a lot by advising me to be less aggressive, to be calmer.

“I’m afraid to bother him with my questions, but I learned a lot from Beat by watching many videos of his runs.”

Alexis Monney

Some see him as the perfect successor to Beat Feuz, triple winner in Wengen, but the Friborg Alexis Monney (23), who will discover the Lauberhorn, is still sometimes embarrassed to challenge the king of the place. “I’m afraid to bother him with my questions, but I learned a lot from Beat by watching many videos of his runs. I analyzed his racing tactics, his lines and his touch of snow. Besides, I would steal his touch of snow, but that’s impossible!

Words corroborated by his eldest Justin Murisier, who will miss the Bernese, despite the places freed up in the descent by the departures of Caviezel and Feuz. “Rather than a place that becomes free, I see it as a loss. We will have to do without him, without his advice. Beat is irreplaceable!”


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